Chapter Five: Tropical Depression

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Featuring: Amber Bernard, Lindy Erkes, Larkin Ford, Y. Malik Jalal, Yanique Norman, Hasani Sahlehe, Taylor Shaw & Marcus Tanner

August 9th - August 30th, 2019

The Mast is proud to present a group exhibition, Tropical Depression, featuring 8 Georgia artists. The show will be up from August 9th to August 30th and the opening reception will be Friday, August 9th from 7-11pm.

Chapter Five: Tropical Depression is about the anticipation, the anxiety and the inevitability of impending doom. This metaphysical atmospheric dread is familiar around these parts; it a cultural marker in the south to remind you that the land remains supreme. With expectations aloof, what left is there to do but to give in? At a moment when expectations are overwhelming and worry is one of the last parts of us that reminds us were human, we find ourselves together; celebrating with one last hurrah.


AMBER BERNARD

Amber Bernard (b. 1995) is a visual artist living and working in Atlanta, Georgia. In 2018 she received a BFA in photography from Georgia State University. Her work employs photographs of objects as stand-ins for metaphors in order to uncover themes present within our current cultural landscape. She has an affinity for polarizing ideas and a fascination with the relationship between humans and advertising, social media, and the overconsumption of images. 


LINDY ERKES

Lindy Erkes grew up tracking wildlife on a 42-acre retired cattle farm in Greenville, South Carolina. Much of her early manipulation of the landscape as a child instigated her further investigation of art making long term. Continuing her art career, Erkes graduated with her BFA from the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, UNCC has a 15-foot permanent installation of Erkes’ work on the front of the Rowe Art Building. Erkes is currently an MFA candidate studying at the University of Georgia-Athens. Her work has grown from ideas of landscape and the body to establish a unique dialogue of the absurdities and cultural clashes of southern queerness. Erkes’ work has been exhibited twice in New York City during 2018. Her first New York showing was at the Bitforms gallery, Give Them the Slip curated by Wendy Vogel and her second was at the Re-Art Show gallery, The Unspeakable curated by Peter Clough.


LARKIN FORD

Larkin Ford spent his formative years in a small town in western North Carolina. He earned his BFA degree at UNC Asheville and his MFA at Georgia State University. He was one of The Oxford American magazine’s New Superstars of Southern Art. He has exhibited work at the Callanwolde Fine Arts Center, Thomas Deans Gallery, Gallery 72, and Eyedrum, and recently published a graphic novella, Goat Song. Ford teaches as a Visiting Lecturer in Drawing and Painting at GSU.

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Y. MALIK JALAL

Y. Malik Jalal is an artist based in Atlanta, GA. He received his BA in Studio Art from Oglethorpe University in 2016. Jalal was born in Savannah, GA, and raised in the Atlanta suburbs. He paints and makes images and objects. His work is equally personal and fictitious, rooted in both the artist’s own identity and his relationship to the collective cultural identity and history of the African diaspora in the American South. In 2018, his work was included in a two-person show at Hi-Lo Press and a group exhibition at The Gallery by Wish and in 2019 his work was shown at Atlanta Contemporary.


YANIQUE NORMAN
A visual artist whose multi-media work explores themes of alienation, identity and the black psychological body. Born in Spanish Town, Jamaica in 1981, Norman migrated to the United States and was raised in Brooklyn, New York from the age of 12. In 2005 she relocated to Atlanta, Georgia and started drawing on her own. With strong encouragement from mentor she completed her studies at Georgia State University (BFA, 2014). She is the recipient of many awards, notably the Walthall Artist Fellowship (2016) and the Mary Brock Williams Scholarship (2013). She has had works featured in national publications such as OxfordAmerican and NOPLACELESSNESS: Art in a Post Urban Landscape and has been profiled and reviewed by various other newspapers and magazines which include The Atlanta Journal Constitution, Creative Loafing, ArtsATL and BURNAWAY. Her work can also be found in numerous museums and public collections throughout region including The High Museum of Art, Hammonds House Museum and Clark Atlanta University Art Galleries. Norman has participated in major museum surveys Drawing Inside the Perimeter (2013) and A Surrealist Conspiracy (2010), which was organized by The High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia.

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HASANI SAHLEHE

Hasani Sahlehe (b. 1991 St. Thomas, USVI) is a multidisciplinary artist. He has exhibited extensively throughout the Southeast. Significant exhibitions include, “Banana Republic” at SCAD Museum of Art and “What a Kallaloo” at the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center. His work has been published in New American Paintings, Atlanta Magazine, and Burnaway. Sahlehe received his BFA in Painting from the Savannah College of Art and Design in 2015.


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TAYLOR SHAW

Taylor Shaw, who holds the record for making the World’s Largest Hushpuppy, was born and raised on the Gulf Coast. Shaw uses the visual language of the coast to explore the economy of nostalgia and the value of kitsch. The souvenir is the focus of his work. Seeking to find value in objects that are not inherently valuable, his work raises questions about the stereotypical imagery of these tourist-based economies and how they rely on memory. Vintage boardwalks, postcards, mini-putt sculptures, and contemporary airbrush tee-shirts...life’s a beach, then you die.Taylor Shaw, who holds the record for making the World’s Largest Hushpuppy, was born and raised on the Gulf Coast. Shaw uses the visual language of the coast to explore the economy of nostalgia and the value of kitsch. The souvenir is the focus of his work. Seeking to find value in objects that are not inherently valuable, his work raises questions about the stereotypical imagery of these tourist-based economies and how they rely on memory. Vintage boardwalks, postcards, mini-putt sculptures, and contemporary airbrush tee-shirts...life’s a beach, then you die.


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MARCUS TANNER

I've been photographing Atlanta and the surrounding South East for about 15 years. With my more Atlanta based work being published in Vice, Creative Loafing and a couple local music zines.  I'd consider my work Gonzo Photojournalism. Trying to capture everyday people in Atlanta, in everyday situations. But in a way that could also be interpreted with much deeper social psychological symbology.  I've just recently stopped lurking the streets to focus on my business PHOTO RIOT! I'm still snapping photos but with custom built Photo Booths!